Understanding essential maintenance KPIs

Industrial maintenance crews must establish baseline productivity goals to facilitate operational transparency and establish a performance-driven shop floor culture.

Industrial maintenance crews must establish baseline productivity goals to facilitate operational transparency and establish a performance-driven shop floor culture. These industry-standard thresholds, usually referred to as key performance indicators, are numerous in form and function. Most organizations spend considerable time deciding which ones to track, as a result. Indeed, different KPIs work in different operational contexts, and sometimes the adoption process involves ample trial and error.

However, with additional understanding, industrial firms can easily navigate the KPI adoption without making multiple attempts.

Mean-time between failure
Many modern firms use mean-time between failure to manage physical shop-floor resources, according to Plant Services. In general, the metric measures asset reliability and can even apply to individual mechanical components. For larger components, MTBF can be measured in hundreds or even thousands of hours. The publication outlined one example in which a water pumping system has a capacity of between 900 and 1000 liters per minute. When a failure occurs, maintenance can tabulate the MTBF by dividing how long it takes for the pump to complete its function by the total number of failures. If the pump requires functions for five years and experience four failures, the MTBF would be 1.25, which amounts to an 80 percent chance of the fixture suffering at least one? failure per year.

Once collected, MTBF figures can be used to assess long-term asset performance and give maintenance crews actionable insight into the shop floor. This metric is applicable at almost any operational level, making it an almost essential KPI within the industrial sector.

Mean-time to repair
While MTBF measures general asset reliability, mean-time to repair takes into account how long it takes to get an out-of-commission shop-floor fixture back up and running, according to APC by Schneider Electric. Normally, this threshold includes asset diagnosis, job assignment and actual on-site repair time. In a nutshell, MTTR gauges maintenance reliability and, in some ways, touches on technician performance. Most organizations express MTTR in hour-long units and use it in tandem with MTBF, as these can create a crystal clear picture of asset availability when considered together.

"Many modern firms use mean-time between failure to manage physical shop-floor resources."

Of course, when it comes to MTTR, the lower the better. In fact, studies show that that the measure often correlates directly to customer satisfaction, according to MetricNet Performance Benchmarking. The average MTTR sits somewhere in the eight hour range. However, some organizations take as long as 27 hours to resolve production asset issues.

Overall equipment effectiveness
Like MTBF, overall equipment effectiveness measure asset health. Unlike its fellow KPI counterpart, OEE addresses three separate variables: availability, performance and quality. However, getting these figures requires a little extra work, Maintenance Technology reported.

Organizations divide asset uptime by scheduled run time and then multiply the resulting figure by 100 to get availability. The performance variable compares how quickly an asset produces to its stock capabilities. OEE users get this measure by dividing the total number of operating widgets by the machine runtime and stock performance capabilities. The resulting figure is multiplied by 100. Quality requires dividing the number of effective widgets by the total number and multiplying that figure by 100.

Once tabulated, these numbers can go into the primary OEE equation, which is availability divided by performance, divided by time, multiplied by 100. The resulting metric encompasses overall asset effectiveness as it relates to production demands and born-in mechanical capabilities.

Each of these figures gives industrial organizations the power to get a top-down view of their operations and generate actionable data that can be used in modern asset maintenance programs.

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